The upper ravine, wedged between Ruter and Bentley Halls, was a popular site for some construction projects in the late nineteenth century. In the 1880s, the road over the ravine between Bentley and Ruter Hall had been widened and raised. The process…

For years the lower ravine was utilized as a disposal site and the location for the Allegheny College campus’ large privy. The introduction of indoor plumbing to the campus in the 1880s and 1890s necessitated the removal of the pungent structure. …

In 1873, the members of Allegheny College’s graduating class planted a circle of pine trees between present-day Ford Chapel and Newtown Observatory. A tree was planted for each of the fifteen members of the graduating class. Despite the name, the…

The Bicentennial Plaza was built on the lawn area in front of Schultz Banquet Hall using a combination of brick and bluestone pavers, echoing the entrances to Bentley Hall and the Tippie Alumni Center. At 40 by 80 feet, the main plaza is a versatile…

The Vukovich Center for Communication Arts is where the theater and communication arts departments are located. President Cook (1996-2009) received the funds to start construction on campus with the goal of creating an eco-friendly campus the…

To the west of the town center, the Woodlawn Cemetery was the burial spot for many town notables, including the families who rose to prominence and fortune during the early development of the oil industry. The cemetery centrance is dominated by the…

During the early years of oil drilling, people didn’t fully comprehend the possible dangers of oil. Many hundreds of lives were lost during the first few decades after the Drake’s first oil well. One such disaster was the Fire & Flood of 1892.…

The historical site marker explains: "There are few bank buildings in America which equal this in permanence and quality of construction..." remarked architect Arthur Zimm. The Titusville Herald reported in 1919 that "...few were prepared for the…

The OC&T RR began operation in 1986 as a tourist attraction, traveling through 13 1/2 miles of the scenic Oil Creek valley to visit sites associated with the history of the oil heritage region. Stops include the Perry Street Station (Titusville),…

The National Transit Building, 206 Seneca Street, Oil City, PA was once the hub of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company. Built in 1890, the main block is a four-story stone and brick building joined to an 1896 annex by an enclosed bridgeway.…

At the age of thirteen, Ida M. Tarbell moved to Titusville, Pa. with her family. She lived here until 1876, when she enrolled at Allegheny College in Meadville. This childhood home at 324 East Main Street is now preserved as an historic site.

The McClintock No. 1 is the oldest functioning well, having produced oil continuously since it was drilled in 1861. The success of this well helped make the fortune of "Coal Oil Johnny," who was adopted by Sarah McClintock.

The story of Pithole began in the spring of 1864 when Isaiah Frazier, James Faulkner Jr., Frederick W. Jones, and J. Nelson Tappan formed the United States Petroleum Company. The company soon leased 64 acres of the Holmden Farm on which they quickly…

Located on the spot where Edwin L. Drake first struck oil on August 27, 1859, the Drake Well Museum (Admission fee required) tells the story of the birth of the modern oil industry. The reconstructed Drake Well demonstrates the first practical use…

During the early years of oil extraction, problems in transporting oil might lead to economic and environmental disasters like the Pond Freshet Disaster of May 31, 1864.

Very little remains at the site of the former Bousson mansion, on their property near Frenchtown, but at one time this elegant home was the center of social life. The Bousson family story begins in the village of Foncine-le-Bas in France. In the…

Bousson Environmental Research Reserve is located in Frenchtown, PA about seven miles from Allegheny College. The history of Bousson includes events that gave it a very good name, and events that nearly destroyed it. While the Bousson family lived…

Since its construction in 1870, the traditional exchange of products between the farmers and townspeople at the Market House has remained strikingly similar due to the efforts of the Meadville community to sustain and protect the building and its…

In 2008, the planning and designing process began for a new residence hall on Allegheny College’s campus, necessitated by the continued growth of the school. North Village II was designed to advance the College’s commitment to sustainability by…

Near the cement walk at the head of the ravine at Allegheny College is a small stone with the Latin phrase "Spes sibi quisque" meaning "Everyone is his/her own hope" and signed by the sophomore class of 1880. Back in the spring of 1877, the…

Raised in this house, Coal Oil Johnny grew up to be one of the most notorious examples of the get-rich-quick lifestyle made possible by the oil boom. Born John Washington Steele in Sheakleyville, PA in 1843, he and his older sister Permelia…

Fireman’s Beach, formerly known as Dennis Beach, has served as a popular location for picnics and recreation since the land became available for public access sometime between 1952 and 1956. With the railroad tracks passing through, visitors would…

Ice House Park was previously home to the Conneaut Lake Ice Company, which provided a key economic resource to the community from 1880 into the 1930s. In 2007, with Keystone funds and a community effort led by Dr. Robert Moss, a public park was…

As the population of Conneaut Lake, which was called Evansburg at the time, began to grow in the 1800s, it became apparent that a more efficient method of transportation was needed. In 1825, the southern extension of the Erie Canal was completed, and…

As a major tourist destination, visitors to Conneaut Lake would have been given competitive options by the local hotels. Since the construction of the Conneaut Lake House in 1823, more than 40 hotels have existed in the area. Beyond just room and…